Running for a Cystic Fibrosis Cure

“I’ve always had a goal in sight,” says North Haven resident Steve Mirabella when speaking about his youth, his career, and his newest aspiration of running in the 2009 New York City Marathon to raise

money for the Boomer Esiason Foundation to help find a cure for those suffering from cystic fibrosis.

While growing up in East Haven, Steve was driven to do well in school and, once at Notre Dame High School in West Haven, he became an honors student. He accomplished an even higher academic record at UConn while studying to become an accountant when he was graduated magna *** laude. When it came time to earn his master’s degree at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, he earned a 3.9 grade-point average.

Steve’s first foray into the business world was as a staff accountant at a major accounting firm in New Haven “and then I spent 19 years at Northeast Utilities [NU],” he says, first in the audit department where he advanced into management. He then capped off his service to NU as the director of human resources.

“I left NU in 1999 to join one of my friends and neighbors in a local accounting practice,” Steve notes, which he decided to leave when the opportunity presented itself nearly eight years ago—via his father—to work for New York Times bestselling author Nicholas Perricone, M.D., who turned a total body and face rejuvenation wellness system into a company that now employs some 70 people.

Today, Steve is chief administrative officer at Perricone M.D. Cosmeceuticals and, during his personal time when not committed to raising his family (daughter Alyssa, 19, and son Matthew, 14) with his wife of 25 years Maria Mirabella, he keeps in shape by running—a fitness pursuit he took up just five or six years ago when age 50 was fast approaching.

Things remained status quo until Steve’s neighbor, attorney Anthony DeChello, suggested that instead of running alone on his home treadmill he think about running in 5K road races.

After the first 5K road race, Steve was hooked. Over the past two years he’s run in more than 25 road races, three half-marathons, and he experienced the thrill of finishing his first 26-mile marathon in Vermont this past May.

To challenge himself even further, Steve decided he wanted to run in the 2009 New York City Marathon, but found the qualification process somewhat daunting. He discovered he could get a guaranteed starting position among some 40,000 runners, however, if he represented a qualified charity.

“It dawned on me I could raise money for the [Norman] Boomer Esiason Foundation, which was founded by the famed football quarterback whose young son has cystic fibrosis,” Steve explains, since his own younger brother, Vincent, now in his mid-40s, has been living with the disease since childhood.

“My original plan was to raise $4,000,” Steve says, but when his letter to friends, neighbors, and colleagues brought in $5,000 the foundation asked him to raise the bar.

“They wanted me to try for $10,000, but I felt more comfortable aiming for $7,500,” Steve notes.

As of Sept. 3, the official charity website tracking Steve’s fundraising progress showed he broke the $6,000 level and he’s now ranked as the number two fundraiser for Team Boomer.

“Running is my true respite,” Steve explains of his commitment to running in races and marathons. “It’s my time to unwind, leave the Blackberry in the car, and have no interruptions. It’s beneficial for my health and I can raise money to help others.”
“I’ve always had a goal in sight,” says North Haven resident Steve Mirabella when speaking about his youth, his career, and his newest aspiration of running in the 2009 New York City Marathon to raise

money for the Boomer Esiason Foundation to help find a cure for those suffering from cystic fibrosis.

While growing up in East Haven, Steve was driven to do well in school and, once at Notre Dame High School in West Haven, he became an honors student. He accomplished an even higher academic record at UConn while studying to become an accountant when he was graduated magna *** laude. When it came time to earn his master’s degree at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, he earned a 3.9 grade-point average.

Steve’s first foray into the business world was as a staff accountant at a major accounting firm in New Haven “and then I spent 19 years at Northeast Utilities [NU],” he says, first in the audit department where he advanced into management. He then capped off his service to NU as the director of human resources.

“I left NU in 1999 to join one of my friends and neighbors in a local accounting practice,” Steve notes, which he decided to leave when the opportunity presented itself nearly eight years ago—via his father—to work for New York Times bestselling author Nicholas Perricone, M.D., who turned a total body and face rejuvenation wellness system into a company that now employs some 70 people.

Today, Steve is chief administrative officer at Perricone M.D. Cosmeceuticals and, during his personal time when not committed to raising his family (daughter Alyssa, 19, and son Matthew, 14) with his wife of 25 years Maria Mirabella, he keeps in shape by running—a fitness pursuit he took up just five or six years ago when age 50 was fast approaching.

Things remained status quo until Steve’s neighbor, attorney Anthony DeChello, suggested that instead of running alone on his home treadmill he think about running in 5K road races.

After the first 5K road race, Steve was hooked. Over the past two years he’s run in more than 25 road races, three half-marathons, and he experienced the thrill of finishing his first 26-mile marathon in Vermont this past May.

To challenge himself even further, Steve decided he wanted to run in the 2009 New York City Marathon, but found the qualification process somewhat daunting. He discovered he could get a guaranteed starting position among some 40,000 runners, however, if he represented a qualified charity.

“It dawned on me I could raise money for the [Norman] Boomer Esiason Foundation, which was founded by the famed football quarterback whose young son has cystic fibrosis,” Steve explains, since his own younger brother, Vincent, now in his mid-40s, has been living with the disease since childhood.

“My original plan was to raise $4,000,” Steve says, but when his letter to friends, neighbors, and colleagues brought in $5,000 the foundation asked him to raise the bar.

“They wanted me to try for $10,000, but I felt more comfortable aiming for $7,500,” Steve notes.

As of Sept. 3, the official charity website tracking Steve’s fundraising progress showed he broke the $6,000 level and he’s now ranked as the number two fundraiser for Team Boomer.

“Running is my true respite,” Steve explains of his commitment to running in races and marathons. “It’s my time to unwind, leave the Blackberry in the car, and have no interruptions. It’s beneficial for my health and I can raise money to help others.”

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